REBECCA

By Laurie Coker

Rating: C

There is wonder in the escapism of classic literature. I love the beauty of a well-filmed period piece. Based on the riveting 1938 Daphne Du Maurier novel, director Ben Wheatley presents a tale of love and secrecy set against the backdrop of breathtaking Hartland Quay in Devon and Hatfield House at Cranborne Manor in Dorset, England. Rebecca stars Lily James and Armie Hammer and the film’s imagery is as beautiful as the couple, but direction and pacing doesn’t always measure up.

James play Mrs. De Winter, a lady servant to an obnoxious woman with no redeeming qualities. She appears trapped in an endless loop of caring for and being berated by Mrs. Van Hopper (Ann Dowd), until she meets the dashing Maxim de Winter (Hammer), a wealthy widow, who sweeps her off her feet. The couple marries and travels back to his ominous, seaside estate Manderley, run by a Nurse Ratched-type house manager, Mrs. Danvers (Kristin Scott Thomas). Soon after her arrival, the new Mrs. De Winter realizes her predecessor casts and long and eerie shadow. Was Rebecca’s death at sea suicide, accident, or murder?

From Du Maurier’s pages, the story reads far more interestingly that does Wheatley’s telling. Adapted by Jane Goldman, Joe Shrapnel, and Anna Waterhouse the story, meant to be captivating and suspenseful, plods along at a sleepwalker’s pace and Hammer’s Maxim is reduced to a brooding set piece. Still, there’s raw honesty to the lead performances and Scott Thomas oozes distaste and disgust at Rebecca’s replacement, but so little is left to intrigue and imagination. The interactions between the pair fall flat making issues with their relationship uninteresting and obvious. James is appropriately mousy, but not enough happens when she called to take charge and stand her ground to prove or support the transition.

While Rebecca certainly sets the scene for a late 30’s storyline, the writers seem to have pulled out all the elements that would have made the tale even more risqué and shocking for the times and now. Maxim marries far below him and while wooing his second bride, he calls her a “a little fool”, but their difference in status never comes into play. Instead the focus is on the unseen Rebecca and her specter haunting the halls of Manderley and an obscure plot that never surprises.

The first adaptation of Rebecca belongs to Alfred Hitchcock, whose iconic 1940 film, which garnered him his only Best Picture Oscar, stands as the decisive take on Du Maurier's gothic romance and it, like the character Rebecca, shadows Wheatley’s version. Were it not for the cast and the exceptional sets and costuming, Rebecca (2020) would be a complete wash. It manages to hang on with its visual attractiveness and stunning scenery. These are gorgeous period details and an inkling of an eerie atmosphere that please just enough. Rebecca earns a C in the grade book.

THE WAR WITH GRANDPA

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3 (Out of 4 Stars)

Based on the children's novel of the same name, The War With Grandpa is a fun and amiable movie for the whole family to enjoy. The film focusses on two vastly different generations, each with their own problems, but with one thing in common. Both parties are very unhappy with their current living situation. The film does succeed in teaching some valuable life lessons to both children and adults, and manages to entertain through some silly and outrageous gags and pratfalls. The themes never get too heavy and somber, but maintain a light, mostly breezy tone intended for easy consumption.

Robert DeNiro stars as grandfather, widower, and senior retiree Ed. After a series of disconcerting mishaps, Ed gets forced by his loving daughter Sally Decker (Uma Thurman) to move in with her family for his own safety. The problem is that in moving in, his grandson Peter (Oakes Fegley) gets relocated from his nice, comfortable bedroom to a not-as-nice and uncomfortable makeshift bedroom in the attic. Frustrated and irritated by this situation, Peter selfishly challenges his grandfather to a "war." This involves a series of annoying, but creative pranks aimed to make his grandfather less comfortable. Though hesistant at first, Grandpa Ed eventually decides to humor his grandson, and give him some doses of his own medicine.

Writers Tom J. Astle, Matt Ember, and director Tim Hill adapt Robert Kimmel Smith's novel for movie audiences. At first, I found myself irritated and annoyed with the premise and how selfish the Peter character is. However, I realized and remembered that children are still in the process of learning things, and that they can be rather selfish while maturing. As I got over these initial feelings, I found myself moderately enjoying the silly antics and begain to get in the spirit of things.

As one can already tell by my rating, the film never truly excels or transcends its aims. It merely serves a teaching tool for children, while also reminding senior citizens that just because their lives are changing, it doesn't mean their lives are completely over.The comedy and gags in the movie are fine. There is a redundant nature to the antics which, at one point, start to wear a little thin, but they never get to the point of completely wearing out their welcome.

The cast all work well together, but with the exception of DeNiro and his onscreen antagoinist, no one really shines as bright as their potential. Uma Thurman and Rob Riggle star as Peter's parents and Ed's daughter and son-in-law. Though it is great to see both of these lovable actor in a movie again, I feel that their talents are absolutely wasted here. The film also features enjoyable appearances by Christopher Walken, Cheech Marin, and Jane Seymour. But it is DeNiro and his co-star Oakes Fegley who shine the brightest.

There isn't much more I can say about this movie that I already have. It is a fun and goofy family film, but one that absolutely needs to be seen theatrically. Nevertheless, the distributing studio has decided to release it in theaters starting this weekend. As likable as this movie is, I wouldn't recommend taking any major health risks to go see it. It will do just fine for a family movie night in one's living room.

A Celebration of Fantastic Fest Review: THE WOLF OF SNOW HOLLOW

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

Writer/director/actor Jim Cummings first got my attention when I experienced his feature film debut Thunder Road at 2018's SXSW Film Festival. Because Cummings created and starred in an incredible, low budget indie pic that hits all the right notes, I was truly blown away by his talents and sincerely hoped that this success would lead to more amazing work. Well, two years later Cummings' sophomore feature, a comedic horror film closes out A Celebration of Fantastic Fest and I am happy to report that his new movie doesn't disappoint. Though not as remarkable as his first movie, The Wolf of Snow Hollow does offer an impressive mix of comedy, horror, heartfelt drama, with another tremendous performance by the versatile artist.

Cummings stars as Deputy Sheriff John Marshall. Living in Snow Hollow, police work is mostly uneventful, but Marshall already has plenty to deal with on his plate. Marshall struggles day to day as a recovering alcoholic, divorcee, loving parent to daughter Jenna (Chloe East) and frustrated son to his ailing father Sheriff Hadley (Robert Forster). Hadley, despite his chronic ailments, refuses to retire as Sheriff, but can barely continue serving as chief of law enforcement. When a series of seemingly related murders begins to plague their quiet, snowy town, Marshall has to step up beyond and above his usual duties and get down to the bottom of this serious situation. To further complicate matters, the local townspeople begin to believe that the murders might not be at the hands of a serial murder, but at the claws and fangs of a werewolf.

Even though Cummings never gets as deep and emotional as he does in Thunder Road, he still manages to get into some, seemingly deep and personal themes with Snow Hollow. Once again the filmmaker walks a fine line between comedy and drama, with both sides offering some strikingly powerful results. Occasionally the movie comes across more awkwardly comedic when it should probably be dramatic, but this reveals the fearlessness of Cummings who isn't afraid to play both of these sides interchangably.

As an actor, Cummings plays a somewhat similar role as his character in Thunder Road. Marshall always seems to be out of his element. He probably got his job through nepotism and has yet to prove himself as a worthy law man. There is a certain manic quality to his character which feels nearly identical to the character in his leading role in Thunder Road This is only indicative of the fact that Cummings really puts his heart into his roles, and isn't afraid to take some major risks. This movie also features some tremendous work by Riki Lindhome, Chloe East, Jimmy Tatro, and Robert Forster who passed away after filming his part.

Though the movie is labeled as a comedy/horror film, the proceedings here aren't all that scary, but are rather suspenseful and dramatic. It is definitely heartening to see that Cummings is probably not just a flash in the pan or a miraculous fluke that accidentally struck gold, but is simply a courageous and talented artist who puts much heart and soul into his work. I must highly recommend The Wolf of Snow Hollow to not only fans of Thunder Road, but people who have yet to discover the talent of Jim Cummings. And to those people who haven't seen Thunder Road, I recommend that they seek it out as soon as possible.

A Celebration of Fantastic Fest Review: THE BOY BEHIND THE DOOR

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

When it comes to Fantastic Fest thrillers, this movie has just about everything one would want from this type of movie. This has harrowing action, tight, nail-biting action, visceral violence, and of course blood and gore. In addition to this lovable qualities, The Boy Behind The Door has lots of heart and two amazing protagonists portrayed by two tremendous child actors. At the conclusion of this movie I certainly had mixed feelings. On one hand, I enjoyed the absolute crap out of this flick, but on the other hand, I wish I had been able to experience it with a live Fantastic Fest audience with box of hot, buttery popcorn. And that's the type of movie The Boy Behind The Door is--a popcorn-chomping thrill ride of tension, suspense, violence, villainy and heroics.

Lonnie Chavis and Ezra Dewey star as Bobby and Kevin, two best friends who will always have each other's backs no matter what. On one fateful day, Bobby and Kevin get attacked by an unknown assailant and abducted to an unfamiliar and remote location. After regaining consciousness, Bobby finds himself locked in the trunk of a car. As he begins to have trouble breathing, Bobby escapes through sheer will. However, there is no way the brave and strong young man is leaving his buddy behind. He begins scouring the house where he and Kevin are being held. Though only about ten or eleven, Bobby decides to take on their larger and more intimidating adult captors, so that he and Kevin can escape once and for all.

Written and directed by David Charbonier and Justin Powell, The Boy Behind The Door is definitely the most exciting film of the festival. I literally sat at home glued to the edge of my seat, chewing off my nails, and screaming and yelling at my screen. It was in those moments that I really longed for the communal experience of the real Fantastic Fest screening. The movie is simply one of those flicks that gets those primal reactions from the audience through superbly conceived and executed shock and awe. Both Charbonier and Powell utilize impecable pacing in delivering the peaks and valleys of their thrill ride. For the most part, the plot is a run-of-the mill escape flick, but with a very youthful twist.

And this youthful twist gets pulled off beautifully by the extraordinary performances by Lonnie Chavis and Ezra Dewey. Both actors bring very different qualities to their roles, but play them outstandingly Lonnie may be only ten or eleven, but this kid channels an inner, hardcore badass. Though outgunned and oversized by his captors, Chavis delivers all-or-nothing courage and tenacity through his character. Ezra Dewey exudes emotional fright, but a different courage of his own as Kevin. Though he mostly plays the role of a frightened victim, he confidently gets more aggressive when the scene calls for it.

I could get into more details about the villains in this movie, but I'd rather leave that as a surprise. I fear that I may have already said too much, anyway. Simply, take my word for it, The Boy Behind The Door (despite this generic uninteresting title) is an absolute blast. And don't make the same mistake I did the first time I watched it. If it is safe to do so watch with a small group of people, and feast on some popcorn while watching it.

A Celebration of Fantastic Fest Review: THE STYLIST

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

I began my virtual festival with this dark tale of obsession and envy. Writer/director Jill Gervargizian puts a more compelling spin on this type of story by making a psychotic killer the protagonist of her film, and a sympathetic one at that. To make things even more engrossing and enthralling, Gervargizian casts actress Najarra Townsend in the lead role, making the character even more appealing and alluring. Don't get me wrong, though. As attractive and sweet Townsend comes across, she is most definitely portraying a frightening and disturbing killer in a riveting and sometimes ghastly movie.

Townsend stars as the titular hairstylist Claire. Claire has established a moderately successful career of cutting, combing and styling mostly women's hair. Though she has great skills, and seems mostly satisfied with her vocation, Claire doesn't have much else going on in her life. Everyday, she sadly hears about the more interesting, exciting, and "happier" lives of her clients. It soon becomes apparent that occasionally Claire loses her mind and has murdered some of her clients.

To further feed her fantasies of wanting to be more like her envied prey, Claire completely removes the scalps and hair of her victims and wears them as wigs, imagining the kind of life she wishes she had. Things get more complicated, however, when a really likable client named Olivia befriends her. As the two women socially bond while discussing Olivia's wedding plans and how she would like her hair, Claire envies her, but at the same time feels conflicted as she likes her very much.

With The Stylist, Gervargizian delivers psychologically complex macabre tale with richly developed characters and a mostly relatable protagonist killer. As dark, disturbing, and revolting the nasty habits of Claire can get, the audiences gets to see and experience her heartbroken side and it really is hard not to feel some sympathy towards her. As I hinted above, I was truly impressed with the complex performance of actress Najarra Townsend who absolutely shines brightly.

As Claire's new confidant, friend and client Olivia, Brea Grant gives a great performance as well. Gervargizian and Grant do some excellent work in developing a very likable source of Claire's envy and admiration. Unlike some of her more smug and loathsome clients/victims, Olivia seems more grounded and kind-hearted than the usual clients who don't seem to deserve or appreciate the more exciting lives they have.

This movie brought my virtual Celebration of Fantastic Fest to a great start and it is a film I sincerely hope reaches swarms of horror fans all over the world. To be honest, the name Jill Gervargizian is one that had escaped my memory if I had previously seen any of her work, but from now on, I will always remember that she is the great talent who helmed The Stylist.

HUBIE HALLOWEEN

By Laurie Coker

Rating: C-

Keeping the kids entertained these can be nearly impossible and with all the CDC expectations for avoiding normal Halloween activities, parents are trying to get creative. Old favorites in spooky family fun are streaming and on-demand, but Adam Sandler and a host of other familiar faces, like Steve Buscemi, Rob Snyder, Kevin James, and Maya Rudolph, star in Hubie Halloween, a Happy Madison production airing on Netflix. Sandler, who promised the worst movie ever should he not get an Oscar nod for his showing in Uncut Gem last hear, and he’s almost done it.

ON THE ROCKS

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

Much like Lost in Translation, Sofia Coppola's latest film feels very personal and expressive of the filmmaker's feelings and life experiences. At the same time, though, this latest entry in her filmography lacks the same level of emotion, introspection, and joie de vivre. Nevertheless, I see a real kinship between the two films and some of this has to do with the welcome presence of Bill Murray. With Bill Murray again in the mix, Sofia Coppola has crafted another engaging and alluring movie that depicts a very different kind of relationship between its leads. Even though On The Rocks never reaches the transcendent levels its spiritual predecessor does, it has enough to say about life, people, and relationships to keep audiences invested and entertained.

Rashida Jones stars as Laura, a writer who has been struggling with writers block while remaining a dutiful wife to husband Dean (Marlon Wayans) and loving mother to Maya (Liyanna Muscat) and Theo (Alexandra Mary Reiner). When not caring for her daughters, Laura struggles to rediscover her voice as a writer. This allows her worried mind to focus on the flaws in her marriage which leads to focusing on suspicions that her husband might be having an affair. To make matters worse, Dean is often away from home, either working night after night or on yet another business trip.

In order to get some insightful advice from a known playboy, Laura consults her father Felix (Murray). Felix jumps at the opportunity to help his daughter and assists with her investigation. As the the once estranged father and daughter begin working together, they truly relish the time they end up spending together. However, Felix might possibly be doing more harm than good, as his low opinion of most men is purely a reflection of his own shortcomings.

Written and directed by Coppola, On The Rocks is a highly lovable and charming comedy that focuses on relationships between spouses, and parents and their children. As I stated above, the film never gets quite as deep and philosophical about the human condition as Lost In Translation, but nevertheless offers some genuine insight and commentary about people and the importance of communication in relationships. The movie might not be Sofia Coppola's finest contribution to cinema, but it is still a solid indicator of her intelligence, experience, and natural wit.

Casting Bill Murray in the role of Felix is an absolute no-brainer. In the film, Felix comes across as a real extension of the actor's public persona. Felix is a truly charming and disarming personality who has a passionate zeal for life. Whiskey, women, and song are his passions, but these loves prove also to be his weaknesses that have caused him relationship woes. Rashida Jones is no slouch in the role of Laura. She ably portrays Laura as a smart, but obviously insecure woman, whose distrust of men stems from her own father's mistakes. Jones gives Laura a palpable guarded quality that contributes to her suspicions of her husband and her struggle as a writer.

The two leads share a credible chemistry as father and daughter in the film that adds to both the comedy and poignancy. This chemistry, along with the casting of Murray, and Coppola's insight on relationships are what make this movie a near-spiritual sequel to Lost In Translation. But like most sequels, this film doesn't deliver the same magic as its predecessor. Still, On The Rocks is a movie I would highly recommend, as it is more enjoyable, charming, and smarter than a lot of other movies of its kind.

ON THE ROCKS will be available on Apple TV+ starting Friday, October 23. ON THE ROCKS is an Apple Original Films and A24 Release. 

SAVE YOURSELVES!

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 2.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

An alien invasion premise sounds like the fodder for a joke directed at 2020. It also happens to be the basic premise for a new comedy movie getting released in this bizarre year. Though the idea of a global, catastrophic event might seem inappropriate given our current state, we often have to laugh at ourselves to heal and recover from our wounds. So, I suppose it is quite timely that Save Yourselves! gets released now when we could use some laughs at our own expense. And though the movie does deliver some a few chuckles and cheer, I feel that the filmmakers behind this movie do not completely succeed in giving audiences a much needed guffaw fest.

Sunita Mani and John Paul Reynolds star as Su and Jack, a co-habitating romantic couple reaching a turning point in their relationship. Though they still love each other very much, they just don't seem to be on the same page. Su and Jack realize that they simply don't communicate like they should because they, like so many people in this world, are so fixated and reliant on their phones, internet and other technology. They both decide that in order to reconnect as boyfriend and girlfriend, they must disconnect from technology and spend some time alone in their friend's cabin in the woods. This normally would be an excellent idea; however, disconnecting from the world initally leaves them clueless about a bizarre alien invasion taking place all around them.

Written and directed by Alex Huston Fischer and Eleanor Wilson, Save Yourselves! offers some very charming relationship comedy, but absolutely feels like it is missing something. Sunita Mani and John Paul Reynolds are both highly likable as their characters and manage to deliver a few solid laughs, but I never, ever found myself laughing whole heartedly and was ultimately disappointed. The mostly benign writing by Fischer and Wilson keep this film from really landing some genuine, laugh out loud humor. And then to top it all off, the ending is definitely a vague disappointment.

I honestly said out loud to my screen, "What?! What kind of ending is that?!" Now, I do realize that it is highly probable that this film is a planned first installment of a new franchise, but if the filmmakers want to really sell me and movie audiences on the idea of continued installments, they seriously needed to get this series off to a way better start. Now I'm sure that the filmmakers had a limited budget to make this movie, but that's where better, more clever writing would've sold me on this concept.

That really is the trouble with this tepid comedy film. The writing simply does not deliver and fails to give talents like Sunita Mani and John Paul Reynolds the proper material to shine. Only time and money will tell if this leads to another installment. In the meantime, my advice to my readers is to save yourselves the trouble and watch another movie.

AVA

By: Laurie Coker

Rating: D

By virtue of the genre, thrillers should be thrilling and Ava, starring Jessica Chastain falls short in countless ways. Instead of using his exceptional cast better, director Tate Taylor relies on clichés and wow-able international sets. Chastain puts heart and soul into the role of a former drug-abuser turned hitwoman but even that doesn’t breathe life into a plodding, implausible plot.  Ava never builds momentum.

Ava rehashes every hitman thriller I can remember. Little stands out expect for Chastain and co-stars John Malkovich and Colin Ferrell. After recovering from drug and alcohol abuse, Ava, turns her life around -first in the military and then in murderer for hire trade, with forty confirmed kills. Unfortunately, Ava’s demons run deep. Broken and battered ties with family, a desire to know why her targets are targeted, and a rocky mental state plague her and as with so many hitmen before her, she becomes the mark.

Chastain stuns battling the baddies sent to “close” her. She demonstrates all the class, cool and cunning of an action hero, but Ava is not the suitable vehicle. It lacks the punch and power she deserves. Charlize Theron’s Atomic Blonde got it but Ava lacks all the thrill, style, and glamor offered up by Atomic Blonde. Chastain has what it takes, she truly does, but even with Malkovich and Ferrell costarring in it, the plot plays out sloppily and with no surprises. The secondary story of a dysfunctional family torn apart by lies and infidelity clunks along and feels forced and out of place. Neither it, nor the primary plot are particularly interesting or engaging anyway. Who cares? – keeps coming to mind.

Regardless of Chastain’s remarkable performance, nothing in Ava is worth caring about. Writer Matthew Newton appears to have taken two completely separate story ideas - one wholly outlandish the other dull as dirt - and melded them together, poorly. Fight scenes disappoint too. They have potential but only one stands out and it is not the final battle sequence. Clad in a gorgeous red dress, hit two in the film, Ava takes out her target and countless soldiers but this in early in the film and from there its downhill.

Ava demonstrates that even with all the right ingredients, a recipe can fail miserably. Where other films in the genre can make fresh from ordinary, Taylor and Newton cannot. Chastain deserves another chance to prove her action-hero mettle, so hopefully the right team notices. Ava earns a dismal D in the grade book.

ANTEBELLUM

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 2.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

There is little doubt that the life experiences of Black slaves can be best described as horrific. However, as far as I know, most cinematic portrayals have never fully gone the horror route. Such is the attempt of filmmakers Gerald Bush and Christopher Renz with their psychological horror film Antebellum. Their premise takes a modern Black protagonist and places her in a world/setting, often thought to be long gone now--the Southern plantation. Though the premise is rather clever, the writer/director duo takes a somewhat confusing route to present their story. This, in addition to the fact that their movie offers few other surprises, make Antebellum a disappointing exercise in horror cinema.

Janelle Monae stars as Veronica Henley, a young, successful Black-American professor who has recently published a book about the problems Black people encounter and how they can work to fight for real liberation. While on a business trip with her dear friends, Veronica gets abducted and later finds herself trapped on an old Southern plantation. She and many other abductees are forced to work as slaves, just as their ancestors once did during the 18th century. Veronica and her new associates plot their escape and are willing to do so violently if necessary.

Written and directed by Bush and Renz, plays out like a slightly convoluted and disorienting mystery-thriller. It is this approach that comes across as a cheap parlour trick in the end and simply reveals that the filmmakers had a novel and clever idea, but didn't know how to execute it well. The social commentary offered by the film doesn't offer its audience anything new or exciting. The protagonist and her close associates are likable and respectable, and this helps the audience connect with them and fell empathy towards their struggles. However, the overly-complicated presentation of the story distracts from the real heart of things

The performances of the cast are solid with Janelle Monae giving a heartfelt and passionate lead performance as Veronica Henley. The villains in the story, come across as the typical, caricaturesque Southern slave drivers that usually gets portrayed in this type of film, though. The movie also features good work by Kiersey Clemmons, Gabourey Sidibe, Marque Richardson, Lily Cowles, and Tongayi Chirisa.

As far as action, violence, and thrills are concerned, Antebellum does deliver these goods, but in the end, one cannot help, but feel somewhat cheated with the finished product. Considering the headways made by Jordan Peele with his movies Get Out and Us, this latest in entry in Black-themed horror is an utter disappointment. As I write the words Black-themed horror, I feel a bit odd that this premise is becoming a subgenre, but honestly, filmmakers have been utilizing the real horrors of the past to make some bold statements and expressions of art with the horror genre. It just so happens, this latest entry is not one of the bold and inventive films we have seen so far.

THE RACER

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 2.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

At this point in our history, most people already know that performance-enhancing drugs have had a huge impact in the world of sports. One of the major controversies to affect professional sports has to be the doping scandal that tainted the sport of cycling. A new film by British filmmaker Kieron Walsh offers an intimate look at a European cyclist who desperately relies on performance enhancements to cling on to a career that is reaching its end. Even though the performance of its lead actor, Louis Talpe, is solid and mostly heartfelt, the movie takes a rather rote approach to its presentation which dulls the overall impact. On top of this, writer/director Walsh and his co-writer Ciaran Cassidy have settled on an annoying abrupt ending which fails to give the film a satisfying conclusion.

Talpe stars as fictional cycling racer Dominque Chabon, a well-seasoned veteran of the cycling circuit about to participate in what might be his last Tour De France. With his position on the team in jeopardy, Chabon remains dedicated to "the program" which involves the use of EPO and blood doping to give him the necessary advantage he needs to remain a valuable member of his team. However, the effects of these techniques are taking a toll on his body and his overall health. As Chabon proceeds with the race, he begins to seriously consider his role in the team and whether or not he is actually valued as a person.

I will say that I was intrigued with this movie and protagonist, but felt disappointed that the movie doesn't dig deep enough to give its audiences a more impactful representation of the character. Like I said above, Talpe puts his heart into the character; however, it is a character that doesn't get the proper development he deserves. For a film that attempts to place value on human lives, that value doesn't get the proper representation it needs. That said, the broad strokes of the film holds it back from being an impactful representation professional athlete experience and all of the pressures that come with this role.

Overall, the cast is decent. Talpe makes for a good protagonist, despite the limitations of the writing. As far as the other cast members are concerned, everyone else offers solid work. The film features fine performances by Matteo Simoni, Tara Lee, Iain Glen, Karel Roden, and several others.

I honestly feel that this film just scratches the surface of what could've been a powerful statement on the state of professional sports. Its heart seems to be in the right place, but the filmmakers definitely pulled too many punches. Performance enhancement is a real health problem in sports that affects many athletes, and I think it is an issue that could get addressed through cinema with an impactful film. But this isn't that movie.

BILL AND TED FACE THE MUSIC

By Laurie Coker

Rating: C-

Some thirty-one years after their “excellent adventure” and nearly thirty years post “bogus journey”, Bill and Ted are back facing the music. Reprising their roles as goofy rockers, Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter stop at nothing to be Bill and Ted – awkward and seemingly clueless and they do an excellent job, but three decades doesn’t bode well. Original writers Chris Matheson and Ed Solomon along with director Dean Parisot miss several great opportunities to make Bill and Ted Face the Music fun and memorable. It is not a total wash, but it fails to measure up to the first in what is now a trilogy.

THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN

By Laurie Coker

Rating: B+

I love traveling with my grandchildren and together we enjoy listening to audiobooks. On one trip, my granddaughter and I, both huge animal lovers, listened to The One and Only Ivan, the story of a silverback ape raised in captivity. Disney+ brings the book, based on a true story, to streaming television. Thea Sharrock directs a stunning blend of live action and remarkable CGI with an excellent cast of real and voice actors.

TESLA

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3 (Out of 4 Stars)

Writer/director Michael Almereyda tells the story of Nikola Tesla in a biopic that takes some novel approaches to its visuals and aesthetics, but ultimately struggles to maintain keep its audience engrossed in it. With Ethan Hawke in the plead role, I expected more from this film, but even the actors talents get held back by the film's weaknesses. Nikola Tesla's life story is truly a fascinating one, but Almereyda just doesn't succeed in proving it as such.

The film begins in 1884 when Tesla begins working for Thomas Edison (Kyle MacLachlan). As the two men offen differ in their visions and opinions, it proves to be a match made in hell. Eventually, after failing to make any headway in Edison's company, Tesla quits and decides to venture out with his new partner Anthony Szigeti (Ebon Moss-Bachrach), hoping to change the ways electricity is harnessed and utilized. Tesla would proceed to do this, but his inability to look at the pictures of his career and life would lead to eventual failure.

Despite some of the bold interesting choices made by writer/director Almereyda, the writing, particularly the story and character development, fails to generate excitement and develop a real connection with its audience. It was as if Tesla himself, being extemely intoverted and narrow focussed, was telling the story himself. There are ways to express this mindset and personality type in more exciting and entertaining ways. However, Amereyda follows a mostly dull path that shows a lack of passion for his subject.

Ethan Hawke performs solidly in the role of Tesla, but just can't seem to transcend the limitations of the writing. I found Kyle MacLachlan more interesting and entertaining as rival Thomas Edison. I also enjoyed the acting of actress Eve Hewson who protrays love interest and the film's narrator Anne Morgan. The movie also features solid work by Jim Gaffigan, Ebon Moss-Bachrach, and Rebecca Dayan.

I feel that Nikola Tesla deserves a more exciting and fulfilling biopic than any film that has already attempted to tell his story. I realize he probably wasn't the most charismatic and personable man, but I believe there are ways of portraying that compellingly. Tesla obviously does not succeed in doing so and leaves much more to be desired.

UNHINGED

By Laurie Coker

Rating: B

Academy Award winner Russell Crowe graces the screen as an utterly detestable and completely deranged man filled with rage and hatred. Director Derrick Borte with a script written by Carl Ellsworth, delivers an intense, shocking thriller, that speaks to the festering issues that silently plague people until all rationale leaves them.  Unhinged is stressful and madly mesmerizing watch andCrowe’s character captivates with his violent craziness.

WORDS ON BATHROOM WALLS

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

Based on the novel of the same name by Julia Walton, director Thor Freudenthal's and screenwriter Nick Naveda's film adaptation offers a mostly moving portrait of a teen struggling with mental illness and the people who love him that are determined to see him persevere. Actor Charlie Plummer stars as lead character Adam Petrazelli, a meek and kind young man afflicted with schizophrenia, a sometimes debilitating condition that causes both visual and auditory hallucinations. Having tried multiple medications with no successful results, Adam, at the behest of his mother Beth (Molly Parker) agrees to go through a trial period with an experimental new drug. Though this new drug finally offers him some efficacy, the side effects are way less than desirable. As Adam pursues a romantic relationship with his classmate Maya (Taylor Russell), he decides to stop taking the medication all together. This strategy, of course, backfires badly when Adams hallucinations start occurring again.

Director Freudenthal and writer Naveda do some exceptional work in giving audiences some vivid and surreal looks int o the mind of character Adam Petrazelli. I have not actually read the novel on which this film is based, so I can only attest to how creatively the hallucinations get presented in the movie. It is definitely a strange journey that ranges between amusing and disturbing. The film does a mostly good job of balancing the humor and the drama, but goes somewhat melodramatic or grandiose at times. That is definitely the film's biggest weakness.

Regardless of this, the lead cast members perform quite well. Charlie Plummer brings a lovably sheepish and appropriately awkward charm to his turn as Adam Petrazelli. He certainly has the range to express the necessary emotions required by his character. Talented actress Taylor Russell first caught my attention in a remarkable movie titled Waves. I was really impressed with her presence and her ability to subtly express various feelings. As Adam's formidable love interest Maya, Russell continues to prove her abilities as a charming and passionate performer.

The movie also features lovely work by Molly Parker, Walton Goggins, and Andy Garcia. Three particular actors, however, manage to steal the show quite often in the the film. These three talents star as hallucinations that represent different facets of Adam's mind. AnnaSophia Robb, Devin Bostick, and Lobo Sebastian all perform exceptionally as Adam's non-existent friends. Though it is a technique that has been utilized a lot in other movies, it's one that works beautifully.

So, I would not be swayed by the fact that tthis movie is a teen romance based on a uoung adult novel. Words on Bathroom Walls has plenty of great things going for it in its favor. It is a film that will tap into a range of emotions, but might particularly resonate with peopke suffering from mental health disorders.

TRAIN TO BUSAN PRESENTS: PENINSULA

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3 (Out of 4 Stars)

South Korean director Yeon Sang-ho, who made a huge splash with his zombie flick Train To Busan, is back with a new installment, Peninsula. Yeon actually takes a page out of the career of zombie master George Romero and has created a sequel with different characters that takes place within the same zombie apocalypse universe. With Peninsula, the director and co-writer Park Joo-Suk go for an even more action-oriented affair that is obviously more fun, but less dramatic and tragic. The result is a fun and exciting movie, but one that lacks the emotional impact of the first installment.

Gang Dong-won stars as Marine Captain Jung-seok. The movie begins more or less where the previous installment ends. A virus that is turning people into violent zombies has rapidly erupted in South Korea, leaving its citizens frantically seeking shelter. Now that Busan is no longer the safe haven it once was, Jung-seok, his sister, brother-in-law, and nephew join the masses of people evacuating the nation. After an infected person manages to get on one of the escape boats, all hell breaks loose when the virus takes hold. Jung-seok and his brother-in-law Chul-min (Kim Do-yoon) manage to escape, but their loved ones are not as fortunate.

Four years later, both Jung-seok and Chul-min continue to live in Hong Kong and cross paths again when they get offered a chance to escape their impoverished existence. A group of Hong Kong people are assembling a small team of people willing to travel to a quarantined peninsula in Incheon where a truck loaded with U.S. dollars is available for the taking. Both Jung-seok and Chul-min agree to participate, despite the risks of being attacked by the zombies that have taken over the peninsula. As the group proceeds with their plans, they discover that it isn't just zombies that pose a threat, it is the uninfected people who continue to reside there.

Written and directed by Yeon Sang-ho who co-wrote the film with Park Joo-Suk, Peninsula does offer audiences exciting action and fun, but lacks the emotional depth that makes the first movie so powerful. The story and character development also fail to achieve the same level of greatness and originality. It is an enjoyable and riveting journey, but ine that treads on all-too-familiar territory. The movie features a wonderful cast that performs tremendously despite the limitations of the script.

It is a movie I do recommend, but one for which ardent fans of the first installment should temper their expectations. Should Yeon Sang-ho decide to maje another chapter in this cinematic universe, I do hope that he and his creative partners will come up with something that will launch this franchise forward into more satisfying territory.

UNHINGED

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 2.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

Russell Crowe, the person, has been known to lose his temper quite infamously. So, it came as no surprise to me that he was cast in a movie about a furious and deranged villain who victimizes someone who crosses him in an unfavorable situation. Now, to clarify, I am not saying that Crowe would actually go to the horrible lengths his character does in the film, but let's just say, it is a role that is not a huge reach for someone of his temperament. That said, Unhinged does offer some palpable suspense, excitement and shocks, but never rises high above similar material presented in Lifetime movies with similar themes.

Crowe stars as Tom Cooper, a middle-aged man going through a very bad time in his life. Though the movie never gives exact details, it does reveal that Cooper has recently gone through a divorce that has pushed him to a breaking point. Meanwhile, mother, and future divorcee, Rachel Hunter (Caren Pistorius) stuggles to adjust to her life as a single mom while in the process of her own divorce proceedings. On one particular morning going wrong, Rachel frantically tries to get her son Kyle (Gabriel Bateman) to school on time, but traffic and fate have other plans. When the frustrated Rachel honks her car horn when Cooper reacts too slowly at a traffic light, it is a decision she will regret during the rest of her soon to be terrifying day.

Written by Carl Ellsworth, and directed by Derrick Borte, Unhinged is definitely a thrilling, tension-filled rollercoaster ride, but never delves deep enough to be taken too seriously. The movie starts out well enough, but when the Rachel character starts making incredulously ridiculous decisions, I grew increasingly frustrated. As the film gets into its intense climax, that's when metaphorical sharks get jumped and the movie goes off the rails. It is sad to say that Lifetime movies have better handled climaxes than this movie. That isn't to say I wasn't entertained, or rather amused. Quite honestly, as this movie itself gets "unhinged," I was laughing hysterically.

As far as the cast is concerned, the performances work well enough for this caliber of movie. Caren Pistorius gives a solid turn, but portrays a character written as someone with limited intelligence. Russell Crowe brings the necessary intensity and rage to his character, but his character also lacks proper development in the writing.

As fun as this movie is, it never succeeds in making an intelligent statement on human affairs. The filmmakers throw in viral videos as examples of similar real events, but this technique comes off as pretentious, given the end result that is this movie. Unhinged is good for some thrills and laughs, but nothing more.

Critica De Cine: THE WAR WITH GRANDPA

Por Liz Lopez

Rating: C+

Si ha visto el avance de “The War with Grandpa” ("La guerra con el abuelo"), entonces básicamente ha visto la película con algunos detalles más para llenar los espacios en blanco y convertirse en el largometraje de 94 minutos. De ninguna manera sugeriré que omita ver esta película, ya que no es una completa pérdida de tiempo, pero es tan predecible que la mayoría de los espectadores que han visto otras películas como “Home Alone” (“Solo en casa”) u otras con escenas similares verán muchas de las mismas travesuras en toda la película.

Basado en el galardonado libro de Robert Kimmel Smith, el guión de “The War with Grandpa” está escrito por Tom J. Astle y Matt Ember. El director Tim Hill ("La película Bob Esponja: Sponge on the Run", "Alvin and the Chipmunks") tiene muchos créditos de escritura a su nombre y son cómico tanto para niños como para adultos, por lo que su dirección hace que la película se mueva con ternura, ademas de momentos familiares seguidos de algunas bromas locas entre el anciano y el adolescente, como se indica en el avance.

La película se considera una comedia familiar, pero si los padres deciden ver esta cinta, debe tenerse en cuenta que hay violencia de payasadas y humor grosero que, en ocasiones, puede no atraer a todas las familias. El abuelo (Robert De Niro) y Peter (Oakes Fegley, "Pete's Dragon", "Wonderstruck") forman parte de esta familia amorosa compuesta por los padres de Peter, Sally (Uma Thurman), Arthur (Rob Riggle) y sus hermanas, Mia (Laura Marano) y Jennifer (Poppy Gagnon). Esta familia es cariñosa, pero tiene alguna disfunción al comunicar las necesidades del abuelo a Peter, quien de repente descubre que tiene que hacer el sacrificio para mudarse de su habitación al ático para acomodar al abuelo. La bienvenida que Peter brinda se convierte rápidamente en una “guerra” para reclamar su habitación y el abuelo decide seguir adelante, estableciendo reglas de compromiso y sin decírselo a los padres. Esta no es una buena manera de comenzar la unidad familiar en mi opinion, especialmente después de que su hija está haciendo todo lo posible para cuidarlo y al mismo tiempo darle a su padre cierta independencia. De todos los actores veteranos de este elenco, el más sorprendente es Uma Thurman interpretando a una madre con tres hijos. Ella tiene una filmografía extensa, pero lo que se destaca en mi mente es su actuación en las películas de Kill Bill de hace más de una década.

Así como Peter solicita la ayuda de sus compañeros de escuela Billy (Juliocesar Chavez) y Steve (Isaac Kragton), entre otros, el abuelo contacta a sus amigos Jerry (Christopher Walken), Danny (Cheech Marin) y Diane (Jane Seymour). Todo el elenco de reparto es bueno en sus papeles, como se esperaba y Oakes Fegley ha conseguido algunos buenos papeles y no tengo ninguna duda de que seguirá teniendo éxito. Su currículum se ve bien con los actores con los que ha actuado, incluida Julianne Moore, y ahora con el legendario Robert de Niro.

Duración: 94 minutos

MPAA rating: PG (rude humor, language, and some thematic elements)

Lanzamiento en salón de cines: 9 de octubre, 2020  

Fuente: 101 Studios

Movie News: NO TIME TO DIE

Movie News: NO TIME TO DIE

Check out the new poster for NO TIME TO DIE in theaters November 20. New trailer coming this Thursday. Source: MGM Studio In No Time To Die, Bond has left active service and is enjoying a tranquil life in Jamaica. His peace is short-lived when his old friend...

Entertainment News: GRACE AND FRANKIE

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Rise up for the penultimate season. Grace and Frankie Season 6premieres globally on Netflix  January 15, 2020. Source: Netflix In Grace and Frankie, Jane Fonda (“Grace”) and Lily Tomlin (“Frankie”) star as two women whose lives are turned upside down when...

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Austin Screening Pass Giveaway: BLOW THE MAN DOWN

Austin Screening Pass Giveaway: BLOW THE MAN DOWN

Source: Amazon

TVR is giving away passes to an advance screening of this movie in Austin, TX, scheduled for Thursday, March 12 at 7:00 p.m.  NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY. Must be 18 or older to enter. See this movie early and free of charge in a theater before it streams on Amazon!

Welcome to Easter Cove, a salty fishing village on the far reaches of Maine’s rocky coast. Grieving the loss of their mother and facing an uncertain future, Mary Beth & Priscilla Connolly cover up a gruesome run-in with a dangerous man. To conceal their crime, the sisters must go deeper into Easter Cove’s underbelly and uncover the town matriarchs’ darkest secrets. 

Go to http://amazonscreenings.com/BTMDTrueViewReviews to claim your passes. Be sure to print the passes and bring them with you to the screening. Do not hesitate as there may be a limited amount of passes available. Arrive early to the theater as seating is not guaranteed and done on a first come, first serve basis. Please spread the word!

THE WAR WITH GRANDPA

THE WAR WITH GRANDPA

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3 (Out of 4 Stars)

Based on the children’s novel of the same name, The War With Grandpa is a fun and amiable movie for the whole family to enjoy. The film focusses on two vastly different generations, each with their own problems, but with one thing in common. Both parties are very unhappy with their current living situation. The film does succeed in teaching some valuable life lessons to both children and adults, and manages to entertain through some silly and outrageous gags and pratfalls. The themes never get too heavy and somber, but maintain a light, mostly breezy tone intended for easy consumption.

Robert DeNiro stars as grandfather, widower, and senior retiree Ed. After a series of disconcerting mishaps, Ed gets forced by his loving daughter Sally Decker (Uma Thurman) to move in with her family for his own safety. The problem is that in moving in, his grandson Peter (Oakes Fegley) gets relocated from his nice, comfortable bedroom to a not-as-nice and uncomfortable makeshift bedroom in the attic. Frustrated and irritated by this situation, Peter selfishly challenges his grandfather to a “war.” This involves a series of annoying, but creative pranks aimed to make his grandfather less comfortable. Though hesistant at first, Grandpa Ed eventually decides to humor his grandson, and give him some doses of his own medicine.

Writers Tom J. Astle, Matt Ember, and director Tim Hill adapt Robert Kimmel Smith’s novel for movie audiences. At first, I found myself irritated and annoyed with the premise and how selfish the Peter character is. However, I realized and remembered that children are still in the process of learning things, and that they can be rather selfish while maturing. As I got over these initial feelings, I found myself moderately enjoying the silly antics and begain to get in the spirit of things.

As one can already tell by my rating, the film never truly excels or transcends its aims. It merely serves a teaching tool for children, while also reminding senior citizens that just because their lives are changing, it doesn’t mean their lives are completely over.The comedy and gags in the movie are fine. There is a redundant nature to the antics which, at one point, start to wear a little thin, but they never get to the point of completely wearing out their welcome.

The cast all work well together, but with the exception of DeNiro and his onscreen antagoinist, no one really shines as bright as their potential. Uma Thurman and Rob Riggle star as Peter’s parents and Ed’s daughter and son-in-law. Though it is great to see both of these lovable actor in a movie again, I feel that their talents are absolutely wasted here. The film also features enjoyable appearances by Christopher Walken, Cheech Marin, and Jane Seymour. But it is DeNiro and his co-star Oakes Fegley who shine the brightest.

There isn’t much more I can say about this movie that I already have. It is a fun and goofy family film, but one that absolutely needs to be seen theatrically. Nevertheless, the distributing studio has decided to release it in theaters starting this weekend. As likable as this movie is, I wouldn’t recommend taking any major health risks to go see it. It will do just fine for a family movie night in one’s living room.

A Celebration of Fantastic Fest Review: THE WOLF OF SNOW HOLLOW

A Celebration of Fantastic Fest Review: THE WOLF OF SNOW HOLLOW

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

Writer/director/actor Jim Cummings first got my attention when I experienced his feature film debut Thunder Road at 2018’s SXSW Film Festival. Because Cummings created and starred in an incredible, low budget indie pic that hits all the right notes, I was truly blown away by his talents and sincerely hoped that this success would lead to more amazing work. Well, two years later Cummings’ sophomore feature, a comedic horror film closes out A Celebration of Fantastic Fest and I am happy to report that his new movie doesn’t disappoint. Though not as remarkable as his first movie, The Wolf of Snow Hollow does offer an impressive mix of comedy, horror, heartfelt drama, with another tremendous performance by the versatile artist.

Cummings stars as Deputy Sheriff John Marshall. Living in Snow Hollow, police work is mostly uneventful, but Marshall already has plenty to deal with on his plate. Marshall struggles day to day as a recovering alcoholic, divorcee, loving parent to daughter Jenna (Chloe East) and frustrated son to his ailing father Sheriff Hadley (Robert Forster). Hadley, despite his chronic ailments, refuses to retire as Sheriff, but can barely continue serving as chief of law enforcement. When a series of seemingly related murders begins to plague their quiet, snowy town, Marshall has to step up beyond and above his usual duties and get down to the bottom of this serious situation. To further complicate matters, the local townspeople begin to believe that the murders might not be at the hands of a serial murder, but at the claws and fangs of a werewolf.

Even though Cummings never gets as deep and emotional as he does in Thunder Road, he still manages to get into some, seemingly deep and personal themes with Snow Hollow. Once again the filmmaker walks a fine line between comedy and drama, with both sides offering some strikingly powerful results. Occasionally the movie comes across more awkwardly comedic when it should probably be dramatic, but this reveals the fearlessness of Cummings who isn’t afraid to play both of these sides interchangably.

As an actor, Cummings plays a somewhat similar role as his character in Thunder Road. Marshall always seems to be out of his element. He probably got his job through nepotism and has yet to prove himself as a worthy law man. There is a certain manic quality to his character which feels nearly identical to the character in his leading role in Thunder Road This is only indicative of the fact that Cummings really puts his heart into his roles, and isn’t afraid to take some major risks. This movie also features some tremendous work by Riki Lindhome, Chloe East, Jimmy Tatro, and Robert Forster who passed away after filming his part.

Though the movie is labeled as a comedy/horror film, the proceedings here aren’t all that scary, but are rather suspenseful and dramatic. It is definitely heartening to see that Cummings is probably not just a flash in the pan or a miraculous fluke that accidentally struck gold, but is simply a courageous and talented artist who puts much heart and soul into his work. I must highly recommend The Wolf of Snow Hollow to not only fans of Thunder Road, but people who have yet to discover the talent of Jim Cummings. And to those people who haven’t seen Thunder Road, I recommend that they seek it out as soon as possible.

A Celebration of Fantastic Fest Review: THE BOY BEHIND THE DOOR

A Celebration of Fantastic Fest Review: THE BOY BEHIND THE DOOR

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

When it comes to Fantastic Fest thrillers, this movie has just about everything one would want from this type of movie. This has harrowing action, tight, nail-biting action, visceral violence, and of course blood and gore. In addition to this lovable qualities, The Boy Behind The Door has lots of heart and two amazing protagonists portrayed by two tremendous child actors. At the conclusion of this movie I certainly had mixed feelings. On one hand, I enjoyed the absolute crap out of this flick, but on the other hand, I wish I had been able to experience it with a live Fantastic Fest audience with box of hot, buttery popcorn. And that’s the type of movie The Boy Behind The Door is–a popcorn-chomping thrill ride of tension, suspense, violence, villainy and heroics.

Lonnie Chavis and Ezra Dewey star as Bobby and Kevin, two best friends who will always have each other’s backs no matter what. On one fateful day, Bobby and Kevin get attacked by an unknown assailant and abducted to an unfamiliar and remote location. After regaining consciousness, Bobby finds himself locked in the trunk of a car. As he begins to have trouble breathing, Bobby escapes through sheer will. However, there is no way the brave and strong young man is leaving his buddy behind. He begins scouring the house where he and Kevin are being held. Though only about ten or eleven, Bobby decides to take on their larger and more intimidating adult captors, so that he and Kevin can escape once and for all.

Written and directed by David Charbonier and Justin Powell, The Boy Behind The Door is definitely the most exciting film of the festival. I literally sat at home glued to the edge of my seat, chewing off my nails, and screaming and yelling at my screen. It was in those moments that I really longed for the communal experience of the real Fantastic Fest screening. The movie is simply one of those flicks that gets those primal reactions from the audience through superbly conceived and executed shock and awe. Both Charbonier and Powell utilize impecable pacing in delivering the peaks and valleys of their thrill ride. For the most part, the plot is a run-of-the mill escape flick, but with a very youthful twist.

And this youthful twist gets pulled off beautifully by the extraordinary performances by Lonnie Chavis and Ezra Dewey. Both actors bring very different qualities to their roles, but play them outstandingly Lonnie may be only ten or eleven, but this kid channels an inner, hardcore badass. Though outgunned and oversized by his captors, Chavis delivers all-or-nothing courage and tenacity through his character. Ezra Dewey exudes emotional fright, but a different courage of his own as Kevin. Though he mostly plays the role of a frightened victim, he confidently gets more aggressive when the scene calls for it.

I could get into more details about the villains in this movie, but I’d rather leave that as a surprise. I fear that I may have already said too much, anyway. Simply, take my word for it, The Boy Behind The Door (despite this generic uninteresting title) is an absolute blast. And don’t make the same mistake I did the first time I watched it. If it is safe to do so watch with a small group of people, and feast on some popcorn while watching it.

Coming Soon To Blu-Ray And DVD: VALLEY GIRL

Coming Soon To Blu-Ray And DVD: VALLEY GIRL

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Multiplatform Video Release: LILYANA

Multiplatform Video Release: LILYANA

Source: ABRAMORAMA LIYANA is a genre-defying documentary that tells the story of five children in the Kingdom of Eswatini who turn past trauma into an original fable about a girl named Liyana who embarks on a perilous quest to save her young twin brothers. The...

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