BLUE BAYOU

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

Writer/director/actor Justin Chon has chosen to use film to reveal a very ugly flaw within US immigration laws that is only well-known to anyone who has faced a similar struggle to remain in this country. This particular law has to do with Asian immigrants who were adopted by Americans, but whose adopted parents did not seek the proper channels to get them a proper citizenship. Such is the case of the protagonist of this movie, who struggles to remain in the US with his new family for whom he has worked so hard to support. With Blue Bayou, Justin Chon delivers an eye-opening film that attempts to spread more awareness of this problem which has affected so many Asian adoptees struggling to continue living here, but have been forced to return to the country of their birth against their will.

Chon stars as Antonio LeBlanc, a Korean immigrant who was adopted by American people in Louisiana, but faced an abusive youth with his new parents. As a result, Antonio has had his legal troubles, but has gotten to a point where he has become a more productive member of society with a new loving wife (Alicia Vikander) and her daughter (Sydney Kowalske). When the complications of his new life undeservably gain the attention of the law and immigration, Antonio struggles to continue living in the United States, but can barely afford the legal expenses that are involved to help him stay in a place he now considers his home.

Justin Chon not only writes and directs a very powerful movie, he also gives an impressive performance as the protagonist of a movie that sends a tremendously important message to the people of this country. While I am aware of the situation regarding immigrants from Mexico, which usually dominates the news and politics on a nearly daily basis, I was not at all aware of the struggles of Asian-American adoptees who have been deported to their places of origin despite the lives they have established here. While this movie does lays its messages a little too thick and a bit melodramatically, it does send some valid messages that our immigration system is in much need of some serious reform.

In addition to Justin Chon, who gives a tremendous performance, Alicia Vikander gives a wonderful turn as Antonio's wife and love Kathy, a woman struggling to support her husband and family, despite the weaknesses and problems that Antonio sometimes brings to their home. I was also certainly impressed with young actor Sydney Kowalske who stars as Jesse, Kathy's daughter from another marriage and Antonio's biggest supporter. This child actor shows an impressive range of emotions that her role demands and absolutely shines and shares a beautiful chemistry with Justin Chon.

While this film is not at all feel-good material, I feel that it is so important that it reaches many people to become more aware of the problems of the immigration laws of our country. It is so easy to take for granted one's citizenship here in the US and I feel that only contributes to the problems that affect people deported from here for all the wrong reasons. Blue Bayou attempts to spread awareness of this issue, and I do wish that it succeeds in its goals.

THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3 (Out of 4 Stars)

Tammy Faye and her one time husband Jim Bakker once had a popular evangelical television program called The PTL Club and hoped to spread their "philosophy" of Christianity to the world. Well as most of the world knows it, The PTL Club and Jim Bakker would eventually become the subjects of controversy when they became the targets of a criminal investigation regarding their acquisition and use of money, along with allegations that Bakker had raped a woman named Jessica Hahn. This film recounts the life and career of these people and attempts to reveal a more human side to these controversial figures. While the film mostly focuses on the life of Tammy Faye, it also fails to properly develop the character of Jim Bakker who was such an important figure in Tammy's life.

Jessica Chastain gives a phenomenal turn as Tammy Faye Bakker, a seemingly loving individual who faced much adversity in her childhood, considering that she was a child from divorced parents. While that might not sound too controversial in modern times, during Tammy's youth, she was considered a God-less pariah within her family's devout Christian church. This galvanized Tammy to remain loving and unjudgmental to anyone with whom she had contact. She would eventually meet her future husband and first love Jim (Andrew Garfield) in a Christian, evangelical school. After forming a romantic relationship, the two would decide to marry and pursue a life spreading the word of God and Christ through any means they could acquire.

Things would get more complicated as they achieved more success on television, as they began working with televangelist Pat Robertson (Gabriel Olds) and would later gain their own television program. Though Tammy would remain undaunted with her messages of love and acceptance, the politics that come with Christianity, along with the problems created by her husband's poor decisions, derailed everything that Tammy hoped to achieve and accomplish.

Written by Abe Silvia and directed by Michael Showalter, based on the documentary film of the same name, The Eyes of Tammy Faye is a rather interesting and often bizarre portrayal of these true events. While the movie is one of those pieces that is hard to watch and one from which is hard to look away, the production, direction and writing seem to struggle with recreating these real events without coming across as a strange and unnerving spoof. Still, despite these issues, the two lead actors deliver phenomenal performances despite the weaknesses of the film itself.

Though the writing definitely does Jim Bakker a disservice, Andrew Garfield gives it his all and has some truly impressive moments on screen. Now, let me be clear, I do not in anyway support or endorse anything Bakker has done or been accused of doing, but I feel that the writing fails to develop his character as a real person and often comes across as a caricature. On the other hand, the movie does a mostly exceptional job of developing Tammy Faye's character and Jessica Chastain gives an awards worthy performance that makes this movie much more watchable than it would've been wihout her calliber of acting.

The film also features some solid turns by the supporting cast, but it is Chastain, and the makeup artists that made her look like the real Tammy Faye, that deserve most of the praise for this movie. I moderately recommend this film as a rather peculiar piece of cinema. It is a movie I like overall, but, obviously, with some criticisms. I feel that Chastain's incredible turn as the titular character that earns this film at least one viewing.

KATE

By Laurie Coker

Rating: C

There seems to be a more noticeable trend now for taking traditional male roles and casting women in them, especially in the violent action film genre. The problem with this lies in the fact that these stories aren’t fresh. Director Cedric Nicolas-Troyan makes a genuine effort to create an action-packed tale of murder, mayhem, and madness. Still, Umair Aleem delivers a story that we have seen far too many times and does it with characters that lack dimension.  

TOO SOON: COMEDY AFTER 9/11

By Laurie Coker

Rating: A-

When is too soon, after a tragedy – to move on, to forgive, to laugh?  ‘Too Soon: Comedy After 9/11’ answers the question of when it is too soon to be situationally funny. The nation and the world witnessed the horrific events of the terror attack on the United States, and twenty years later, we are still grappling with the reality of the aftermath. Documentarians Nick Scown and Julie Seabaugh delve into the weeks, months, and even years that followed the events and the issues that faced comedians, talk show hosts, and Broadway stars as they ventured back to their respective stages to bring laughter – including tiptoeing around the tragic elephant in the room.

DEATH DROP GORGEOUS

By Liz Lopez

Rating: C+

When a film is listed as being in the horror/comedy genre, some folks may inquire how these two genres can describe one film.  Scripted and directed by Michael J. Ahern, Christopher Dalpe and Brandon Perras, these three writer/directors also co-star in their own film. There is no doubt that this is a horror film they have written, given that there are various individuals killed in/around a Providence, Rhode Island drag club — The Out House. The kills are rather graphic and there is gory violence, blood spurts and all. Many individuals are not fans of horror films and generally they may not be fans of the “comedy” in this film. Death Drop Gorgeous does have some scenes that have a bit of humor to it, but I find it hard to use the word comedy for it. The one sentence I recall that is memorable is from one queen to another in the backstage dressing room, “If you’re gonna have two faces, at least make one of them pretty.”

The club run by Tony Two Fingers (Brandon Perras) has a stage where various queens perform their acts, and the drag shows have lip synched performances and fabulous make up/wardrobe that look very professional. The performers include Rosebud Cianci (Joshua Kilby), Lindsay Fuckingham (David Joseph Rivera), Tragedi (Complete Destruction), Audrey Heartburn (Paul Bohn) and Janet Fitness (Matthew Pidge). The elder of these is Gloria Hole (Michael McAdam), with a tired/outdated act and few admirers/fans left. Quite bitter, Gloria is not at all impressed when an aspiring queen, Brian (Christopher Dalpe) seeks advice and wardrobe. Gloria’s bitterness extends to many in the community and the audience soon learns to what extent the performer will go to keep her spot on the stage.

Brian’s close friend/roommate, Dwayne (Wayne Gonsalves), takes a job to tend bar when he returns to town. Soon after he starts his job, the murders begin. Tony Two Fingers doesn’t want bad publicity for his venue, so he calls in a detective buddy, O'Hara (Michael J. Ahern) to “take care of the body” and who then saddles his partner, Detective Barry (Sean Murphy) to do the dirty work. As another person bites the dust, the detectives start to think there is a vampire. The detectives make some statements as they discover each body and those may come across as humorous to people who like that sense of humor, but it can also come across as callous.  

I admire the true indie spirit of the filmmakers and glad it has found success/fans in the festivals it has played. Watch it with an open mind as there are some scenes that have some acting that could use some tweaking, and others that are over the top – and that is not necessarily a bad thing in some films. Perhaps when the filmmakers have a bigger budget, we may see some more of their creativity with additional resources.

Rating: Unrated, nudity, sex, profanity, drug abuse

Running time: 1:44 It will be releasing in physical theaters (L.A, CO) and virtual theaters (nationwide), as well as On Demand on September 10th.

Source: Dark Star

THE CARD COUNTER

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

Writer/director Paul Schrader definitely has a dark side, and every film he contributes is a testament to this prominent facet. His latest film, The Card Counter, wears this dark, tormented soul on its sleeve for the most part, but also comes across as a reflection of a filmmaker grasping for hope in horrible world. Through his lead character, Schrader shows a filmmaker who wishes his characters can rise above the degeneration of everything in this world that threatens to bring everyone down to the level of bottom feeders.

Oscar Isaac stars as William Tell, a professional gambler who knows his trade well enough to survive and continue doing what he has practiced for some time. Prior to his new career, William served in the military and eventually found himself working as an interrogator/torturer of prisoners held by the U.S. government. When the government finally decided to crack down on these extreme, inhuman measures, William, along with several of his colleagues, were held accountable for their attrocities and forced to do some time in a military prison. While serving his sentence, Tell learned the skills to become a modestly successful professional card player, honing the crafts needed to win in Blackjack and Poker.

Upon his release, Tell focuses this mastery into traveling all over the United States winning money in the country's various casinos. Keeping a mostly low profile, Tell gets enticed into becoming a more prominent and recognizable player after a couple of fateful events pursuade him to go against his usual reservations. First of all, a big money poker scout by the name of La Linda (Tiffany Haddish) tries to recruit William to become a team player for some interested investors. However, it is William's encounter with a young man named Cirk (Tye Sheridan), someone connected with his dark past who galvanizes him to pursue a more ambitious endeavor in his work.

Written and directed by Paul Schrader, The Card Counter is a fascinating and gripping dark tale that acts as a compelling character study of a man struggling with the dark sins of his past. Schrader not only show impressive skills in his presentation of the story, but his writing of the story reflects a filmmaker that can still deliver films that are powerful, emotional, and often disturbing. My main complaint about this movie is that some of the darker, more intense and potent moments come across as watered down and restrained. This comes as a big surprise to me, because a lot of Schrader's previous films never hold back when it came to unnerving and frightening elements. Still, as far as this year is concerned, this film is genuinely remarkable and should be considered one of the better movies made this year.

This is not only thanks to the great story telling, character development and direction by Schrader, the actors in the movie give such incredible performances that are worthy of recognition. As William Tell, Oscar Isaac gives what is arguably one of his finest performances so far. Isaac has such an amazing grasp for the character and all of his facets that he is definitely an inspiration to anyone pursuing a career in acting. As La Linda, Tiffany Haddish gives a solid dramatic turn that exudes her natural charm and shows a level of restraint for which she is not that well known. As Cirk, Tye Sheridan gives a tremendous performance as William's new menteee that seriously needs guidance and wisdom from someone who has experience.

Now even though The Card Counter might not be Paul Schrader's best film, it is most certainly a remarkable work that deserves much admiration and respect. The filmmaker simply knows how to capture a feeling of torment, despair, and disspiritedness and immerses his protagonists in these emotions. His characters struggle to do their best to rise above the lowest levels of human existence, which is a genuine struggle a lot of us face in real life. His films reflect the fact that there is no perfect path or strategy to overcome these obstacles, but we often have to embrace what we abhor in order to keep us going.

EVERYBODY’S TALKING ABOUT JAMIE

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

Prior to watching this film, I was totally unaware of the stage play that inspires this remarkabe and lovable movie. After enjoying it, however, I would absolutely love to see a wonderful stage production as this story is truly meant to be experienced. That is not to say, at all, that I did not like this movie adaptation. No, this would be quite far from the truth. Director Jonathan Buterell has made a vibrant and joyous musical film, with a delightful cast of actors, that should galvanize audiences to seek stage productions of this wonderfully remarkable true story. The movie tells the story of an enthusiastic gay teen who aspires to become a superstar on the stage, but definitely wants to do so on his own terms.

Max Harwood stars as Jamie, a teenager in Sheffield, England who has always been an outcast and an outsider, but has huge dreams of becoming a star as a drag queen. Though his blue collar, conservative home of Sheffield isn't exactly condusive to his aspirations, Jamie remains undaunted in what he wants to do with his life. Despite the fact that his father (Ralph Inneson) has pretty much abandoned the family, Jamie's loving and supportive mother (Sarah Lancashire) relishes in everything that makes Jamie special. Jamie decides, as his final act of defiance to the dull and boring life that Sheffield has to offer, that he will attend his prom in drag and in a most triumphant way. In pursuing his goals, Jamie comes across a former drag queen and dress shop owner in Sheffield by the name of Hugo Battersby (Richard E. Grant). Hugo, who at one time expressed himself as the drag queen Loco Chanelle, encourages and tutors Jamie to become his most fabulous self ever.

Based on the musical stage play by Dan Gillespie Sells and Tom MacRae, which is based on the true life of a British drag queen, Everbody's Talking About Jamie is a joyous and inspiring musical movie that should not only be a crowd-pleaser, but should also empower LGBTQ youth to express themselves freely. Though the movie has plenty of effervescent songs and themes, the film also addresses the negative reactions that homophobic, ignorant people can have toward these life styles and how these responses can hurt and harm people who simply want to express themselves in different ways. With a screenplay by Tom MacRae, director Jonathan Buterrell does a great job of recreating this vivacious and life-affirming story for cinema.

With a wonderful assortment of great, catchy songs and a fine cast performing them, it is certainly difficult to not love what this movie has to offer. As the titular Jamie, Max Harwood is an absolute joy to behold. The young performer acts and sings with a potency and a zest for life that is undeniable. As his wonderful mother Margaret, Sarah Lancashire brings much dimension, heart and vulnerability to the character. As Pritti Pasha, Jamie's best friend and closest confidant, Lauren Patel is absolutely wonderful. It would be an absolute sin if I don't mention the amazing and impassioned turn by Richard E. Grant who shines wonderfully as Jamie's mentor Hugo Battersby/Loco Chanelle, the seasoned former drag queen who knows exactly what Jamie needs to soar as high as he possibly can.

Everybodys Talking About Jamie will be available in both theaters and will be available for streaming via Amazon Prime, but it is a movie I am so glad I experienced on the big screen. It is a truly delightful, syrupy sweet movie that has some timely and wonderful messages about life and the importance of pursuing one's dreams.

SHANG-CHI AND THE LEGEND OF THE TEN RINGS

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

The Marvel Cinematic Universe expands its world further to include a back story that it has only been previously touched upon, but now finally explains its true origins. In previous films, Iron Man and Iron Man III, the legend of The Mandarin and the Ten Rings has been played with and has baited comic fans with its realization. This film finally clarifies these characters and their place in the MCU in ways that are both extraordinary and compelling. Shang-Chi and The Legend of the Ten Rings delivers an MCU installment that is both a spellbinding tale and has some top notch action and thrills that wil keep comic fans pleased.

Long ago, a man named Xu Wenwu (Tony Leung) discovers the Ten Rings, which grant him great powers and immortality. Using them, he eventually builds an organization of warriors called The Ten Rings that he utilizes to further build his power. Many years later, after discovering and losing the love of his life, Wenwu continues to use his power for further domination in the world of crime and terrorism. His son Shang-Chi, knowing the power that his father wields escapes from home and flees to America. Now an adult, Shang-Chi (Simu Liu) and his best friend Katy (Awkwafina) live a mostly unassuming life in San Francisco. However, Xu Wenu sends his people to find his son and disturb the once peaceful life Shang-Chi has established for himself for so long.

Written and directed by Destin Daniel Cretton, who co-wrote the film with Dave Callaham and Andrew Lanhan, Shang-Chi and The Legend of the Ten Rings is an absolute delight when it comes to world building, incredible action, and clarifying story elements that have already been established in the MCU. With rich character development, a riveting story, and a wonderful realization of mytholgy, the movie delivers on so many levels. My only complaint that I have with this film has to do with the CGI used to present the magical moments and fantasy that the film demands. One would think that Disney and the MCU would have the budget and talent to pull off some of the visual effects and CGI that this movie requires. Unfortunately, that is not the case here.

Nevertheless, I absolutelly enjoyed this movie. It features drama, action, and humor in all of the best ways. The entire cast performs well and helps realize characters that are relatable, potent, and entertaining. I left this screening much more excited than I had originally anticipated and feel that the producers behind the MCU are headed in some wonderful directions. This is definitely a movie that deserves to be experienced on the big screen, despite its weakness.

Critica de cine: THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE

Por Liz Lopez

Rating: B+

The Eyes of Tammy Faye está dirigida por Michael Showalter (The Big Sick, The Lovebirds) y se basa en el documental de 2000 del mismo nombre de Fenton Bailey y Randy Barbato, con guión de Abe Sylvia. Todavía no he visto el documental original, pero esta versión proporciona detalles sobre ambos personajes, Jim (Andrew Garfield) y Tammy Faye Bakker (Jessica Chastain) que quizás algunas personas no conocen. Aunque algunos fanáticos del cine pueden pensar que están lo suficientemente versados ​​en la familia Bakker, Chastain y Garfield ofrecen actuaciones muy entretenidas que involucran a los espectadores para aprender más sobre ellos. Su habilidad para entretener, además de parecer identificables con la audiencia de televisión, es cómo los Bakkers se convirtieron en los grandes empresarios del espectáculo de su tiempo (y construyeron sus grandes cuentas bancarias). En la película, vemos el ascenso y la caída de esta pareja que está muy en el centro de atención, pero vale la pena ver esta película dramatizada para quizás ver a Tammy Faye de una manera que quizás no haya estado disponible antes.

Muchos de nosotros, de cierta edad, crecimos escuchando sobre su programa en la televisión, pero quizás éramos demasiado jóvenes para comprender todo lo que hicieron cuando comenzaron en la década de 1960. Ciertamente, cualquiera que moviera el control remoto no podía perderse su distintivo maquillaje exagerado, ni su voz de marioneta en el programa como una forma de llegar a los niños (quienes a su vez tendrían a la audiencia adulta).

Vemos a Tammy Faye al principio como una niña y la relación con su mamá. En la década de 1950, ella es la niña bonita que asiste a una universidad bíblica y ve / oye a Jim cuando está en el escenario como estudiante predicador. Jim quiere captar la atención de la gente y eso hizo con Tammy, lo que llevó a su matrimonio poco después. Ella también es intérprete e insiste en ser parte de su trabajo en Christian Broadcasting Network, dirigido por Pat Robertson (Gabriel Olds). Luego Jim presenta "The 700 Club" y le encanta ser la estrella del espectáculo. Despues, los Bakker tienen su propio programa y el televangelismo está en camino tal como lo conocemos.

Vincent D’Onofrio interpreta a Jerry Falwell, que no limita su verborrea negativa sobre los homosexuales. También da a conocer que las mujeres son seres menores, solo para ser vistas y no escuchadas. Hay una gran escena en la que los hombres se reúnen en una mesa durante una fiesta en una casa y Tammy Faye no se quedará fuera de esa reunión. D’Onofrio es excelente para demostrar el desprecio que siente por la intromisión y su opinión sobre ciertos temas. La feminista cristiana invita a Steve Pieters (Randy Havens), un hombre con sida, a su programa y Falwell está en condiciones de estar atado. Ella toma una posición a favor de la compasión en oposición al odio que ve gestarse entre otros en el círculo cristiano.

Jim quiere la fama y todos los adornos que la acompañan. Él funda la PTL Satellite Network y comienza a estafar a la audiencia para que financie un parque temático. Su atracción por los hombres es evidente y se revela en una escena en la que Tammy Faye está en el estudio y lo ve luchando "amistosamente" en el suelo con su asistente. La expresión de su rostro la hace detenerse, sorprendida al darse cuenta de que el hombre con el que se casó ha llevado una doble vida, tanto en el amor como en las finanzas.

Si bien Chastain es excelente en su papel de extravagancia, con el cabello, el maquillaje, la ropa y las pieles, también nos muestra el otro lado de Tammy que el público no ve con demasiada frecuencia. Y es difícil no importarle lo que le pasó.

Tripulación: Cámara: Michael Gioulakis. Editores: Mary Jo Markey, Andrew Wiesblum. Música: Theodore Shapiro.

Reparto adicional: Cherry Jones, Sam Jaeger, Fredric Lehne, Chandler Head, entre otros.

Clasificación MPAA: PG-13. Duración: 126 minutos La película se estrena en cines el 17 de septiembre.

Fuente: Searchlight Pictures

Screening Pass Giveaway: DEAR EVAN HANSEN

Source: Universal Pictures

TVR is giving away passes (good for two people) to an advance screening of this movie in Austin, TX, scheduled for Tuesday, September 21 at 7:30 p.m.  NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY. Must be 18 or older to enter. See this movie early and free of charge before it opens in theaters!

The breathtaking, generation-defining Broadway phenomenon becomes a soaring cinematic event as Tony, Grammy and Emmy Award winner Ben Platt reprises his role as an anxious, isolated high schooler aching for understanding and belonging amid the chaos and cruelty of the social-media age.  

Directed by acclaimed filmmaker Stephen Chbosky (The Perks of Being A Wallflower, Wonder), the film is written for the screen by the show’s Tony winner Steven Levenson with music and lyrics by the show’s Oscar®, Grammy and Tony-winning songwriting team of Benj Pasek & Justin Paul (La La Land, The Greatest Showman).

Featuring Grammy winning songs, including the iconic anthem “You Will Be Found,” “Waving Through a Window,” “For Forever” and “Words Fail,” Dear Evan Hansen stars six-time Oscar® nominee Amy Adams, Oscar® winner Julianne Moore, Kaitlyn Dever (Booksmart), Amandla Stenberg (The Hate U Give), Colton Ryan (Apple TV+’s Little Voice), Nik Dodani (Netflix’s Atypical), DeMarius Copes (Broadway’s Mean Girls) and Danny Pino (NBC’s Law & Order: Special Victims Unit).

Dear Evan Hansen is produced by Marc Platt (La La Land, Into the Woods, Mary Poppins Returns) and Adam Siegel (2 Guns, Drive), and is executive produced by Michael Bederman, Steven Levenson, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul.

Go to http://gofobo.com/nkENr44796 to claim your passes. Be sure to print the passes and bring them with you to the screening. Do not hesitate as there may be a limited amount of passes available. Arrive early to the theater as seating is not guaranteed and done on a first come, first serve basis. Please spread the word!

Noticias e Lanzamiento: The Gateway tiene premiere en el hogar

Por Liz Lopez

La pelicula de género crimen/thriller, The Gateway, tiene su lanzamiento en EE UU en algunos cines, Bajo Demanda y en Digital, luego ahora esta disponible en DVD y Blu-ray tambien.

SINOPSIS: Parker (Shea Whigham, American Hustle), Dahlia (Olivia Munn, X-Men: Apocalypse) y Duke (Frank Grillo, The Grey) protagonizan este gráfico thriller de crimen que te mantendrá pegado al asiento. Parker, un trabajador social con poca suerte se ve abrumado cuanto trata de proteger a su cliente de su marido, el cual acaba de recibir la libertad condicional. ¿Puede Parker salvar a su familia de la violenta amenaza que representan un narcotraficante maníaco y su equipo, los cuales están desesperados por recuperar su inestimable alijo de drogas?

Reparto adicional: Zach Avery (Mike), Taryn Manning (Corey), Mark Boone Junior (Gary), Keith David (Terry), Taegen Burns (Ashley), Alex Wraith (Louis) con Bruce Dern (Marcus).

Tráiler Oficial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhzRU54jQtk

Dirigida por: Michele Civetta

Guion de: Álex Félix Bendaña y Andrew Levitas & Michele Civetta

Producida por: Andrew Levitas, Stephen Israel

Productores Ejecutivos: James T. Russell, Jeremy Salvador

Coproducida por: Stevie Curtis, W. Jeffery Frizzell

Director de Fotografía: Bryan Newman

Diseño de Producción: Michael Fitzgerald

Editor: Suzy Elmiger, ACE

Diseñadores de Vestuario: Christopher Oroza & Laura Cristina Ortiz

Supervisor Musical: Alix Brown

Compositor Musical: Alec Puro

Productor en Línea: Kenneth Altman

Cásting: Susan Shopmaker, CSA

Clasificación: R por escenas fuertes de violencia, uso generalizado de expresiones lingüísticas fuertes, consumo de drogas, algunas escenas de contenido sexual y desnudos. Duración: 91 minutos

ESPECIFICACIONES TÉCNICAS

Año de Producción: 2021

Título Original: © 2020 Gateway Film Inc. Todos los Derechos Reservados.

Subtitulado: Subtítulos en Español, Francés, en Inglés para sordos y personas con dificultades auditivas

Formato del Blu-ray: Alta Definición 1080p Presentación 16x9 (2.00:1)

Formato del DVD: Presentación 16x9 (2.00:1)

Audio del Blu-ray: 5.1 DTS-HD Master AudioTM en inglés

Audio del DVD: 5.1 Dolby Audio en inglés

Contenido Especial del Blu-ray / DVD / Digital: Living Legends: El Reparto de The Gateway, Tráiler

Liongate Grindstone Entertainment presenta una produccion de Metalwork Pictures

https://www.lionsgate.com/movies/the-gateway

Fuente: Lionsgate

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Screening Pass Giveaway: DEAR EVAN HANSEN

Screening Pass Giveaway: DEAR EVAN HANSEN

Source: Universal Pictures

TVR is giving away passes (good for two people) to an advance screening of this movie in Austin, TX, scheduled for Tuesday, September 21 at 7:30 p.m.  NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY. Must be 18 or older to enter. See this movie early and free of charge before it opens in theaters!

The breathtaking, generation-defining Broadway phenomenon becomes a soaring cinematic event as Tony, Grammy and Emmy Award winner Ben Platt reprises his role as an anxious, isolated high schooler aching for understanding and belonging amid the chaos and cruelty of the social-media age.  

Directed by acclaimed filmmaker Stephen Chbosky (The Perks of Being A Wallflower, Wonder), the film is written for the screen by the show’s Tony winner Steven Levenson with music and lyrics by the show’s Oscar®, Grammy and Tony-winning songwriting team of Benj Pasek & Justin Paul (La La Land, The Greatest Showman).

Featuring Grammy winning songs, including the iconic anthem “You Will Be Found,” “Waving Through a Window,” “For Forever” and “Words Fail,” Dear Evan Hansen stars six-time Oscar® nominee Amy Adams, Oscar® winner Julianne Moore, Kaitlyn Dever (Booksmart), Amandla Stenberg (The Hate U Give), Colton Ryan (Apple TV+’s Little Voice), Nik Dodani (Netflix’s Atypical), DeMarius Copes (Broadway’s Mean Girls) and Danny Pino (NBC’s Law & Order: Special Victims Unit).

Dear Evan Hansen is produced by Marc Platt (La La Land, Into the Woods, Mary Poppins Returns) and Adam Siegel (2 Guns, Drive), and is executive produced by Michael Bederman, Steven Levenson, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul.

Go to http://gofobo.com/nkENr44796 to claim your passes. Be sure to print the passes and bring them with you to the screening. Do not hesitate as there may be a limited amount of passes available. Arrive early to the theater as seating is not guaranteed and done on a first come, first serve basis. Please spread the word!

BLUE BAYOU

BLUE BAYOU

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

Writer/director/actor Justin Chon has chosen to use film to reveal a very ugly flaw within US immigration laws that is only well-known to anyone who has faced a similar struggle to remain in this country. This particular law has to do with Asian immigrants who were adopted by Americans, but whose adopted parents did not seek the proper channels to get them a proper citizenship. Such is the case of the protagonist of this movie, who struggles to remain in the US with his new family for whom he has worked so hard to support. With Blue Bayou, Justin Chon delivers an eye-opening film that attempts to spread more awareness of this problem which has affected so many Asian adoptees struggling to continue living here, but have been forced to return to the country of their birth against their will.

Chon stars as Antonio LeBlanc, a Korean immigrant who was adopted by American people in Louisiana, but faced an abusive youth with his new parents. As a result, Antonio has had his legal troubles, but has gotten to a point where he has become a more productive member of society with a new loving wife (Alicia Vikander) and her daughter (Sydney Kowalske). When the complications of his new life undeservably gain the attention of the law and immigration, Antonio struggles to continue living in the United States, but can barely afford the legal expenses that are involved to help him stay in a place he now considers his home.

Justin Chon not only writes and directs a very powerful movie, he also gives an impressive performance as the protagonist of a movie that sends a tremendously important message to the people of this country. While I am aware of the situation regarding immigrants from Mexico, which usually dominates the news and politics on a nearly daily basis, I was not at all aware of the struggles of Asian-American adoptees who have been deported to their places of origin despite the lives they have established here. While this movie does lays its messages a little too thick and a bit melodramatically, it does send some valid messages that our immigration system is in much need of some serious reform.

In addition to Justin Chon, who gives a tremendous performance, Alicia Vikander gives a wonderful turn as Antonio’s wife and love Kathy, a woman struggling to support her husband and family, despite the weaknesses and problems that Antonio sometimes brings to their home. I was also certainly impressed with young actor Sydney Kowalske who stars as Jesse, Kathy’s daughter from another marriage and Antonio’s biggest supporter. This child actor shows an impressive range of emotions that her role demands and absolutely shines and shares a beautiful chemistry with Justin Chon.

While this film is not at all feel-good material, I feel that it is so important that it reaches many people to become more aware of the problems of the immigration laws of our country. It is so easy to take for granted one’s citizenship here in the US and I feel that only contributes to the problems that affect people deported from here for all the wrong reasons. Blue Bayou attempts to spread awareness of this issue, and I do wish that it succeeds in its goals.

THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE

THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3 (Out of 4 Stars)

Tammy Faye and her one time husband Jim Bakker once had a popular evangelical television program called The PTL Club and hoped to spread their “philosophy” of Christianity to the world. Well as most of the world knows it, The PTL Club and Jim Bakker would eventually become the subjects of controversy when they became the targets of a criminal investigation regarding their acquisition and use of money, along with allegations that Bakker had raped a woman named Jessica Hahn. This film recounts the life and career of these people and attempts to reveal a more human side to these controversial figures. While the film mostly focuses on the life of Tammy Faye, it also fails to properly develop the character of Jim Bakker who was such an important figure in Tammy’s life.

Jessica Chastain gives a phenomenal turn as Tammy Faye Bakker, a seemingly loving individual who faced much adversity in her childhood, considering that she was a child from divorced parents. While that might not sound too controversial in modern times, during Tammy’s youth, she was considered a God-less pariah within her family’s devout Christian church. This galvanized Tammy to remain loving and unjudgmental to anyone with whom she had contact. She would eventually meet her future husband and first love Jim (Andrew Garfield) in a Christian, evangelical school. After forming a romantic relationship, the two would decide to marry and pursue a life spreading the word of God and Christ through any means they could acquire.

Things would get more complicated as they achieved more success on television, as they began working with televangelist Pat Robertson (Gabriel Olds) and would later gain their own television program. Though Tammy would remain undaunted with her messages of love and acceptance, the politics that come with Christianity, along with the problems created by her husband’s poor decisions, derailed everything that Tammy hoped to achieve and accomplish.

Written by Abe Silvia and directed by Michael Showalter, based on the documentary film of the same name, The Eyes of Tammy Faye is a rather interesting and often bizarre portrayal of these true events. While the movie is one of those pieces that is hard to watch and one from which is hard to look away, the production, direction and writing seem to struggle with recreating these real events without coming across as a strange and unnerving spoof. Still, despite these issues, the two lead actors deliver phenomenal performances despite the weaknesses of the film itself.

Though the writing definitely does Jim Bakker a disservice, Andrew Garfield gives it his all and has some truly impressive moments on screen. Now, let me be clear, I do not in anyway support or endorse anything Bakker has done or been accused of doing, but I feel that the writing fails to develop his character as a real person and often comes across as a caricature. On the other hand, the movie does a mostly exceptional job of developing Tammy Faye’s character and Jessica Chastain gives an awards worthy performance that makes this movie much more watchable than it would’ve been wihout her calliber of acting.

The film also features some solid turns by the supporting cast, but it is Chastain, and the makeup artists that made her look like the real Tammy Faye, that deserve most of the praise for this movie. I moderately recommend this film as a rather peculiar piece of cinema. It is a movie I like overall, but, obviously, with some criticisms. I feel that Chastain’s incredible turn as the titular character that earns this film at least one viewing.

KATE

KATE

By Laurie Coker

Rating: C

There seems to be a more noticeable trend now for taking traditional male roles and casting women in them, especially in the violent action film genre. The problem with this lies in the fact that these stories aren’t fresh. Director Cedric Nicolas-Troyan makes a genuine effort to create an action-packed tale of murder, mayhem, and madness. Still, Umair Aleem delivers a story that we have seen far too many times and does it with characters that lack dimension.  

read more…
BLUE BAYOU

BLUE BAYOU

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3.5 (Out of 4 Stars)

Writer/director/actor Justin Chon has chosen to use film to reveal a very ugly flaw within US immigration laws that is only well-known to anyone who has faced a similar struggle to remain in this country. This particular law has to do with Asian immigrants who were adopted by Americans, but whose adopted parents did not seek the proper channels to get them a proper citizenship. Such is the case of the protagonist of this movie, who struggles to remain in the US with his new family for whom he has worked so hard to support. With Blue Bayou, Justin Chon delivers an eye-opening film that attempts to spread more awareness of this problem which has affected so many Asian adoptees struggling to continue living here, but have been forced to return to the country of their birth against their will.

Chon stars as Antonio LeBlanc, a Korean immigrant who was adopted by American people in Louisiana, but faced an abusive youth with his new parents. As a result, Antonio has had his legal troubles, but has gotten to a point where he has become a more productive member of society with a new loving wife (Alicia Vikander) and her daughter (Sydney Kowalske). When the complications of his new life undeservably gain the attention of the law and immigration, Antonio struggles to continue living in the United States, but can barely afford the legal expenses that are involved to help him stay in a place he now considers his home.

Justin Chon not only writes and directs a very powerful movie, he also gives an impressive performance as the protagonist of a movie that sends a tremendously important message to the people of this country. While I am aware of the situation regarding immigrants from Mexico, which usually dominates the news and politics on a nearly daily basis, I was not at all aware of the struggles of Asian-American adoptees who have been deported to their places of origin despite the lives they have established here. While this movie does lays its messages a little too thick and a bit melodramatically, it does send some valid messages that our immigration system is in much need of some serious reform.

In addition to Justin Chon, who gives a tremendous performance, Alicia Vikander gives a wonderful turn as Antonio’s wife and love Kathy, a woman struggling to support her husband and family, despite the weaknesses and problems that Antonio sometimes brings to their home. I was also certainly impressed with young actor Sydney Kowalske who stars as Jesse, Kathy’s daughter from another marriage and Antonio’s biggest supporter. This child actor shows an impressive range of emotions that her role demands and absolutely shines and shares a beautiful chemistry with Justin Chon.

While this film is not at all feel-good material, I feel that it is so important that it reaches many people to become more aware of the problems of the immigration laws of our country. It is so easy to take for granted one’s citizenship here in the US and I feel that only contributes to the problems that affect people deported from here for all the wrong reasons. Blue Bayou attempts to spread awareness of this issue, and I do wish that it succeeds in its goals.

THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE

THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE

By Mark Saldana

Rating: 3 (Out of 4 Stars)

Tammy Faye and her one time husband Jim Bakker once had a popular evangelical television program called The PTL Club and hoped to spread their “philosophy” of Christianity to the world. Well as most of the world knows it, The PTL Club and Jim Bakker would eventually become the subjects of controversy when they became the targets of a criminal investigation regarding their acquisition and use of money, along with allegations that Bakker had raped a woman named Jessica Hahn. This film recounts the life and career of these people and attempts to reveal a more human side to these controversial figures. While the film mostly focuses on the life of Tammy Faye, it also fails to properly develop the character of Jim Bakker who was such an important figure in Tammy’s life.

Jessica Chastain gives a phenomenal turn as Tammy Faye Bakker, a seemingly loving individual who faced much adversity in her childhood, considering that she was a child from divorced parents. While that might not sound too controversial in modern times, during Tammy’s youth, she was considered a God-less pariah within her family’s devout Christian church. This galvanized Tammy to remain loving and unjudgmental to anyone with whom she had contact. She would eventually meet her future husband and first love Jim (Andrew Garfield) in a Christian, evangelical school. After forming a romantic relationship, the two would decide to marry and pursue a life spreading the word of God and Christ through any means they could acquire.

Things would get more complicated as they achieved more success on television, as they began working with televangelist Pat Robertson (Gabriel Olds) and would later gain their own television program. Though Tammy would remain undaunted with her messages of love and acceptance, the politics that come with Christianity, along with the problems created by her husband’s poor decisions, derailed everything that Tammy hoped to achieve and accomplish.

Written by Abe Silvia and directed by Michael Showalter, based on the documentary film of the same name, The Eyes of Tammy Faye is a rather interesting and often bizarre portrayal of these true events. While the movie is one of those pieces that is hard to watch and one from which is hard to look away, the production, direction and writing seem to struggle with recreating these real events without coming across as a strange and unnerving spoof. Still, despite these issues, the two lead actors deliver phenomenal performances despite the weaknesses of the film itself.

Though the writing definitely does Jim Bakker a disservice, Andrew Garfield gives it his all and has some truly impressive moments on screen. Now, let me be clear, I do not in anyway support or endorse anything Bakker has done or been accused of doing, but I feel that the writing fails to develop his character as a real person and often comes across as a caricature. On the other hand, the movie does a mostly exceptional job of developing Tammy Faye’s character and Jessica Chastain gives an awards worthy performance that makes this movie much more watchable than it would’ve been wihout her calliber of acting.

The film also features some solid turns by the supporting cast, but it is Chastain, and the makeup artists that made her look like the real Tammy Faye, that deserve most of the praise for this movie. I moderately recommend this film as a rather peculiar piece of cinema. It is a movie I like overall, but, obviously, with some criticisms. I feel that Chastain’s incredible turn as the titular character that earns this film at least one viewing.

KATE

KATE

By Laurie Coker

Rating: C

There seems to be a more noticeable trend now for taking traditional male roles and casting women in them, especially in the violent action film genre. The problem with this lies in the fact that these stories aren’t fresh. Director Cedric Nicolas-Troyan makes a genuine effort to create an action-packed tale of murder, mayhem, and madness. Still, Umair Aleem delivers a story that we have seen far too many times and does it with characters that lack dimension.  

read more…
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